Waterbone: Tibet – The lost story of a journey

You can only be called a true LISTENER of music if you have the ability to respect music made from the unlikeliest of sounds. My first tryst with Waterbone was a cassette bought by my father at an attempt to find Indian sounds in America. He had gone almost sentimentally collecting remotely Indian sounding albums from the American Music Stores and came back to India triumphant of having found mystic chants in this band’s debut album.

For me Tibet was more than that, it was a window to this mysterious land that has been fighting its existence for decades. It was a sound that transports you to the Himalayas. It was real because the artists had in fact traveled to these lands and recorded with Tibetan artists. It was not like the typical Enigma album (no disrespect to the artist), it didn’t have the technology of recorded voices. What it did contain was the voice of a people finding peace in spite of the turmoil around them.

Jimmy Waldo, one of the members of the group, one of the founding members of an ’83 hard rock group Alcatraz, has been a rocker throughout his life. The album is a testament to respected hard rockers like Robert Plant because they choose to tread paths untread by those before them, he chose to change his genre purely in his quest for something that touches his soul.

Tibet is more than just a trance, electronic, lounge album, it’s the voice of a forgotten land, the chant of peace and hope for a place that has forgotten it under ages of oppression.

But the song that started it all, the one that led my father’s thought to this album is this one song that takes you right at the foothills of Himalayas on a spiritual journey. Presenting to you, the “Song For the Mountain”